“Working Man” Timely, relevant look at purpose and compassion

May 27th, 2020 Posted by Review 0 thoughts on ““Working Man” Timely, relevant look at purpose and compassion”

Robert Jury’s debut feature film “Working Man” stars Peter Gerety as Allery, an older, quiet factory worker whose manufacturing plant is closing. This small town business is one of the last to go, devastating an already depressed town and leaving its workers and the community at a dire loss. Allery isn’t ready to stop working, though, and as he continues his routine, his co-workers band with him and change this town. The consequences are far greater than anyone could have imagined, shaking the foundation upon which Allery and his wife Iola (Talia Shire) stand.

To say that this is a quiet film is an understatement, but actions speak much louder than words. Allery’s quiet demeanor has a sadness behind it as he shuffles down the sidewalk, walking to work after methodically and almost mindlessly packing his own lunch, much to his wife’s surprise. The dilapidated homes and the boarded up shops punctuate the depressed affect we are seeing in Allery. But this town, like so many similar Midwestern towns suffering from industry shutdowns, is close knit. Everyone knows each other’s business and when Walter (Billy Brown), a newer resident and factor worker, begins to accompany Allery to “work,” a feeling of hope and solidarity arise.

This is a story of the need for purpose in life as well as, ultimately, compassion. The friendship between Walter and Allery is an unusual one and Jury makes sure that we root for success for each of them, although never allowing ourselves to relax and breathe as there is so much more than meets the eye. The relationship between Iola and Allery is forced to be examined thanks to Walter’s unexpected influence, emphasizing the need for facing our past and our demons.

Jury captures the heart and soul of so many towns like this one, but it is the heart and soul of Allery, with very little dialogue, that is so profoundly portrayed. Allery is suffering and initially we think we know why, but again, what we see on the surface is just covering up what truly lies beneath. While Allery is our focal point, Walter, a handsome, gregarious, and charismatic but somewhat mysterious man, reveals his backstory, but the fallout has already occurred, driving Allery to a final decision. He has changed and we see this happen like a butterfly emerging from its cocoon.

This ensemble cast is stellar, lead by Gerety whose subtle actions and reactions are immensely powerful. A glance or an aversion of his eyes with a slight intake of air tells you more than a thousand words could ever do and these actions connect you to him as you want to find out more. Jury never reveals too much in his script, like a carrot dangled before you, pulling you toward an emotional discovery. Together with Shire and Brown, the main characters are supported skillfully by the rest of this talented cast.

Visually, the cinematography captures the essence of Middle America as it is filmed in Illinois. Jury found neighborhoods, bridges, and landscapes near Joliet and many of the supporting cast is from the Chicago area. Finding an ideal location like this augments a storyline that seems more relevant today than when Jury initially wrote the script nearly 10 years ago. With a real environment and local actors, the credibility of the film soars.

Jury’s gorgeously shot and written “Working Man” is a topical film with evocative performances reminding us of the importance of having a purpose in life, and compassion for others.

4 Stars

“Working Man” is available on all major digital platforms.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Archives

    

Know if you should go, subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required

Thanks for visiting! Please join my email list to get the latest updates on film, my festival travels and all my reviews.

CONTACT

Bourbonnais, Illinois
www.reelhonestreviews.com

site design by Matt K. © All rights belong to Reel Honest Reviews / Pamela Powell